Module 5: Representivity


KEY CONCEPTS AND OUTCOMES

Module 5 of the course deals with representivity in SP processes and the need to consider that not all stakeholder groups have the same voice. SP practitioners have to account for all possible constraints that may prevent stakeholders from participating; while stakeholder groups can resort to representatives, caucusing or NGO or networks support to have a stronger voice. Key concepts covered include:

  • Who has how much voice Participants will discuss potential imbalances in a SP process and what groups are often left out (women and the poorer, for example). Non-accessible language, time constraints, social hierarchies and other constraints to participation will be discussed in the light of the participants’ experience.
  • For SP practitioners: how to ensure representivity? Ways for SP processes to ensure representative stakeholder groups will be discussed. Points of discussion include assistance provided by the project to people who cannot participate and the role of stakeholders themselves in defining a representative stakeholder list.
  • For SP participants: how to have a stronger voice? Participants will discuss how stakeholders can organise themselves to have a stronger say, e.g. by selecting representatives, requesting assistance from networks and NGOs, and caucusing. Participants will provide examples of existing mechanisms or channels for stakeholders to have their say.

SUPPORTING MATERIAL
A One Stop Participation Guide: A Handbook for Public Participation in Environmental Assessment in Southern Africa (SAIEA): pages 52 to 55

Documents


SP Module 5: Representivity Notes

This module deals with representivity in SP processes and the need to consider that not all stakeholder groups have the same voice.


SP Module 5: Representivity Notes

Who has how much voice, for SP practitioners: ensuring representivity, for SP participants: how to have a stronger voice


Case Study: Natural and Cultural Land Use in Cape York Australia

Marginalised groups getting their voices heard.


Case Study: A Coordination Platform for Forest Management in Nepal

The need for open communication and conflicting interests.